Handloom Product
Jamdani Saree
 
Originally a dress material for both men and women, but now a days it is made only in Saree lengths in an astounding variety of designs with geometrical motifs, on simple frame or pit looms. Traditionally, Jamdanis are white. However, today, very lightly dyed grounds with designs in white, maroon, black, green, gold and silver Saree and mega silk of a dark golden colour are also seen.
 
Dhakai muslin has now lost its legendary fineness but it continues as Jamdani, with beautiful extra weft decorations on a fine surface. After the partition of Bengal in 1947, many Hindu weavers of the Dhakai Jamdani and Tangail tradition of East Bengal migrated to India and were rehabilitated at a few settlements in West Bengal, the most important of which are Samudragarh Fulia, Mugberia, Muradihi and Dhatrigram.
 
The pattern of the design drawn on paper, is pinned beneath the warp threads and, the weaving proceeds, the designs are worked in link embroidery.
 
When the weft thread approaches close to where a flower or other figure has to be inserted, the weaver move up one of a set of bamboo needles round each of which is wrapped yarn of a different colour as needed for the design.
 
As every weft or woof thread passes through the warp, he sews down the intersected portion of the pattern with one or another of the needles as might be required, and so continues till the pattern is completed. When the pattern is continuous and regular, as in the usual Saree border, a master weaver generally dispenses with the aid of paper patterns. Very often, two persons work together on a Jamdani Saree.
 
Traditionally, Jamdanis are white, with designs in bleached white. However, today, very lightly dyed grounds with designs in white, maroon, black, green, gold and silver Saree, and muga silk of a dark golden colour are also seen.
 
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